How Communists Discredit Anti-Communists

Among the groups who tried to distinguish the truth from the lie were the White emigres, Russians who had fled their homeland after the Soviet takeover. They were particularly vulnerable to the attack of disinformers. In Western Europe in the early 1920s they were considered to be a valuable and important anti-Communist factor. The emigres numbered about a million people of whom some 135,000 were still under arms and were thought to represent a potential anti-Communist armed force. Among the leaders of this group were men .. who exerted considerable influence over some Western statesmen.

Natalie Grant

In 1921, in order to discredit anti-communist White Russian emigres, the Soviet special services spread false information connecting White Russians with anti-Semitism. According to Natalie Grant’s book on Soviet disinformation, Moscow wanted to portray the average White Russian “as a person dangerous to society, politically immature, conservative to the point of stupidity and engaging in criminal pursuits.”

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Ukraine, Russia and the Post-Soviet Civil War

If Yugoslavia was an example of an army let loose after the collapse of a communist regime, the Soviet Union exemplified a disintegrating police state. The type of anarchy that follows from these two scenarios is different. Instead of open civil war as in Yugoslavia, in Russia the civil war is covert.

Wisła Suraska

The brilliance of Wisła Suraska’s book, How the Soviet Union Disappeared, and the brilliance of Anatoliy Golitsyn’s book, New Lies for Old, leave us with two equally important yet incompatible accounts of Soviet collapse. Suraska’s sociological approach, with its deep political science and insights into the weaknesses of the Soviet system, serve as an indispensable guide. At the same time, Golitsyn’s understanding of Soviet counterintelligence, with its controlled opposition and extensive agents networks, helps to explain why the Evil Empire continues under V. Putin.

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Magic and Destruction

He who does not have demonic seeds within him will never give birth to a new world.

Dr. Ernst Schertel

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Such was an annotation found in Adolf Hitler’s copy of Schertel’s book, Magic: History-Theory-Practice. It seems that Hitler had no problem with “demonic seeds.” And he wanted to “give birth to a new world” — as did Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin.

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